Best Intel Core i7 7700K Black Friday Deals 2020 | Cyber Monday

Deal Score0
Deal Score0

The top-end Kaby Lake chip is a depressing slice of silicon because, despite how resolutely unimpressive an upgrade it really is, the Core i7 7700K continues to be the innovative desktop CPU you can purchase right now. It’s as effective as the 7th Gen Core architecture gets until we see Kaby Lake-X towards the finish of the year, but weighed against the 6th Gen Skylake chips there’s little new here to get worked up about. Sigh. Black Friday & Cyber Monday sales are best time to get huge discount and save good money.

Get Intel Core i7 7700K in cheapest Price in Black Friday & Cyber Monday Sales

Discount on Intel Core i7 7700K in Amazon

Check Price Intel Core i7 7700K in Walmart, target, bestbuy, ebay,

And this will be a lttle bit of a problem for Intel’s already-abandoned Process>Architecture>Optimisation product release cadence. The optimisation stage appears like getting the least interesting releases and that’s the part that’s getting extended with further 14nm releases like Coffee Lake…

Intel Core i7 7700K specifications
The Core i7 7700K may be the direct alternative to the Core i7 6700K and is nearly identical to the prior chip in several ways. To begin with we’re still looking at pretty much the same 14nm production process at play with the Kaby Lake i7, it’s still essentially using the same Skylake architecture and also the same four cores / eight threads HyperThreaded configuration.

It also slips in to the same LGA 1151 slot as Skylake, gets the same TDP and the same cache. Which means you can either drop a Kaby Lake CPU into a preexisting Z170 board or choose among the Z270 motherboards as the house for your brand-new CPU. You may also do the same with last-gen Skylake chips; if you fancy a number of the goods available with a 200-series board but don’t wish to upgrade your 6th Gen Core CPU you don’t need to.

And this is mainly because they’re simply the same damned chips with just the slightest of tweaks. Sadly this appears like what we’re likely to need to live with for the tertiary phase of Intel’s new Process>Architecture>Optimisation cadence.

Previously Intel’s CPUs were either built on a fresh transistor node or featured an totally new microarchitecture. This is the foundation for the ol’ tick-tock release schedule where in fact the tick was a die-shrink on a preexisting architectural design and the tock was a complete new CPU layout. This changed to a three step, Process>Architecture>Optimisation, approach because of the increased difficulty in effectively shrinking how big is functional transistors.

That’s been abandoned before we’ve even had one release cycle, so it’s now tick, tock, stutter, flail, flog a vintage production process. We’ve several optimised chip generations developing to extend the life span of a CPU architecture featuring both current design and the prevailing production process. At least Intel are giving us another handful of cores to experiment with in exchange for nearly zero architectural changes with the upcoming 14nm Coffee Lake designs.

I assume the thinking is that with both an adult processor design and an adult lithography Intel should be able to squeeze out every last drop of potential performance from their chips.

As the name suggests, the 7700K is another K-series variant, this means it comes with an unlocked multiplier and, given the optimised process, we must hope the overclocking performance of the Kaby Lake generation has been boosted.

The truth is though we’re just obtaining a processor which maintains the prior generation’s dominance but is not capable of really pushing things any more.

As I said though, there are a few slight tweaks. Normally the one being the change in base and Turbo clockspeeds. Out of your box the Core i7 7700K has a 4.2GHz base and 4.5GHz Turbo frequency. That is a function of Kaby Lake as an optimised version of the Skylake architecture’s 14nm design. A year after then inaugural Skylake release Intel have already been able to wring a bit more performance out from the silicon with a little extra energy required using small changes in the production process, now called 14nm+.

The other big change may be the new Kaby Lake media engine. This signifies that as of this moment 4K media streaming is on the PC because Intel have enabled hardware-level acceleration for the encoding and decoding of 10-bit HEVC content. Despite getting the capacity to run 4K media the Skylake and Broadwell generations haven’t had the native hardware acceleration essential for streaming the 4K out of Netflix. If you are still likely to have to utilize the Edge browser if you need it running on your computer.

With regards to the CPU-based graphics in the i7 7700K they’re accurately everything you might expect, totally irrelevant to us. We’re focused on PC gaming at PCGamesN, and Intel’s HD graphics aren’t. End of.

Intel Core i7 7700K verdict
Here it comes, the $350 question: in the event you choose the Core i7 7700K? The answer isn’t a fairly easy one because as the top-end Kaby Lake processor may be the innovative CPU silicon around it’s in no way a must-have component.

Realistically I can’t recommend you get a 7700K unless you’re upgrading from a 4 or 5 year-old i7 and need that combo of cores and threads. But even then, it’s not cut and dried – the Core i7 6700K is practically nearly as good and may even arrive much cheaper than the 7700K.

The good thing there is that if you’ve got a 6700K in one’s body and were beginning to feel just a little jealous of the brand new CPU generation then you’ve got no reason behind concern. No-one with a Skylake CPU should think about a Kaby Lake chip unless they’re switching from i3 to i5 or i5 to i7. And if you’re a gamer first then your frame rate performance difference between an i5 and an i7 CPU is minimal, so I’d recommend you make a beeline for

We will be happy to hear your thoughts

Leave a reply

Black Friday Deals and Cyber Monday Sales Discount 2020
Logo
Enable registration in settings - general